Close Showreel

Drama in the workplace

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NetflixNetflix is the number 1 reason I don’t get enough exercise. Mainly because being a sucker for a good story (current obsession: The Good Wife) means that I find it hard not to click ‘Watch Next Episode’ as soon as the credits roll…

But although I may not be getting fitter I do feel like I’m learning stuff.  Thanks to ‘Lie To Me’ I can spot an untruth from a mile away. ‘House of Cards’ and ‘The West Wing’ are the only reason I know anything at all about American Politics.  And after only a couple of episodes of the Killing I think, quite wrongly as it turns out, I can understand Swedish.

That’s because mingled in with the great scripts and acting performances are lots of other subtle, messages.  Messages about different cultures, though process, and procedures, and in walks of life that I just wouldn’t be exposed too any other way.   And that’s the great thing about quality drama, the writers do the all the hard work for you.  Dripping tons of research seamlessly into each episode to make what you’re watching believable.

It’s why quality writing works wonders in a business setting too.  A serialised drama or comedy is going to beat a PowerPoint every time when it comes to getting staff to retain information.  If there’s a vivid premise, relatable characters and a bit of action you’ll find staff anticipating the next instalment of their training programme.   Storytelling is a powerful way of uniting information with emotion, and in doing so engaging with your staff.  But it demands insight and creativity to present an idea with enough punch to be memorable. If you get it right, then you get people discussing your messaging at the water cooler instead of unconsciously ignoring you.

Now if you’ll excuse me I’m off to watch the next season of Game of Thrones.

Product marketing with a wee bit of comedy…

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You may have stumbled across this online advert, Just a Wee, for the Bathstore last month.  It marked a bit of a departure from the brands usual lifestyle videos and made a pretty good stab at going viral by using a mix of eye watering slapstick and a comedy set up.

The aim was to promote its range of soft-close toilet seats, and well there’s a man who wishes he had one when he was a child, a confused girlfriend and a dog that… well it’s probably best you just watch it for yourself.

With 220k hits in the first 2 days rising to just over 751k in a month it has had its fair share of exposure – especially when you remember that it’s a toilet seat we’re talking about not the latest must have gadget.  Where it gets interesting is when you look at the response that it’s had on YouTube.  Although it’s had a lot more thumbs up that thumbs down, a quick glance down the comment section reveals an almost a 50/50 split amongst posters, ranging from the positive –

 

“Awsome ad. I’m glad to see marketers are getting their sense of humour back!”

Shawn Benson 

“The first pre-roll advert I actually wanted to share! Well done”

Bellyfloptv

 

To the positively offended,

 

“Whoever signed off this viral ad should be taken to task, it really is stooping to a new low just to sell product. what will it be next, the Power Shower foofoo cleaner? – Please, stick to adverts which have a bit of class – unless of course you have changed the demographic of your target market?”

Ian Holmes

And that Ian, really is a very good question.  Does altering your marketing output simply swap one audience for another? Personally I’d argue that doing something a bit different, and showing a sense of humour is something that should be applauded.  It exposes the Bath store brand to a new audience and gets blogs like this one written to help spread the word.   Whether all that activity equates to sales though is something I look forward to seeing once the campaign results are in.

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